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A Warning to All Ankles

16 Feb

Watch out when in pit lane!

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(pic courtesy of Voltex Japan

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Red Bull Hopes to Turn the Heat Down

16 Feb

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Testing time in Jerez didn’t go too well for Red Bull. For all the design genius of Adrian Newey, the team broke out the drills a few weeks ago just to scallop out the body work in hopes the car would just cool down. Temperatures were at an average high of 58F degrees, and an average low of 43F – hardly hot. But the heat was on in the Red Bull kitchen as everyone packed up and left early, with hardly any laps completed. You know Newey has been burning the midnight oil these past few weeks, figuring out a way to either 1. somehow get a Ferrari engine in the back of his otherwise stellar creation, or 2. figure out how the heck to get this engine to stay within temperature limits this time around. Temperatures predicted in Bahrain over the next few days will average a very spring like 69-70 ish F, and a low not much lower. Beautiful weather over there this time of year.

Of course, there is one more test session scheduled in Bahrain, at the end of the month. That’s it, over and done with. Then the first race is mid March in Australia – where temperatures will likely be similar to what it is in Bahrain. So who’s running hotter right now? The Red Bull engine, or Newey himself? No doubt he’s under a tremendous amount of pressure. Afterall, their star drivers can’t do much if the car isn’t fully functional. With that said, there is no doubt that Newey is perhaps the greatest F1 engineer in the series history. He has a knack for applying his Hawking-esque brain to the world of racing. While I’m a Tifosi a heart, I’m rooting for Newey, and I think he will figure it out. We all know the season is long, and literally everything can happen. Particularly with the new engines, not to mention all the new rules for this year.

F1 Uncut

12 Feb

Saw this on several other blogs, but worthy of posting…it will make you laugh if you’re aware of what this season has in store

It’s Gotta Be The Shoes…….

9 Feb

nsxtimeattack

Nothing new about GC10G’s, a simple wheel that in the right sizes, seems to compliment nearly any sports car. Nothing particularly new about the NSX either, except that fact that 23 years after it’s introduction, and 8 years after the last ones rolled off the assembly line, it’s still one of the best expressions of how the Japanese “get” sports cars, and can integrate aesthetic beauty with mechanical precision. Despite it’s age, it’s a car that is still racing all over the world, still being developed, still being made better by firms like Esprit. Pushing the envelope of performance and reliability, vs dumping their efforts and jumping on the “new and now” bandwagon. Nothing new about (or from, for that matter) L.O.T.U.G. But they incorporated that iconic line and integrated it into what would become a seminal song within it’s genre. How’s that for a Venn Diagram! Picture courtesy of http://worldtimeattack.com

Errrr……Spotted?

9 Feb

From awhile ago just never posted

New McLaren?

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Not quite

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You Don’t Look Your Age

19 Jan

And probably never will. Toyota did a fantastic job with the ST185 Celica.

GTFour-RC-655x435

Samco Sport Hose Color Chart

3 Jan

samcocolorrange

From turbo inlets, to radiator hose kits, to intercooler hoses and everything in between, Samco is the go-to name in the motorsport world for quality multiply silicone hoses. No, they are not the cheapest, bargain basement kits on the market. But they fit perfectly, they have no flashing that you need to trim, they are molded with care in their UK factory, and best of all, they offer a wide range of color options. Got a rare car that you want a set of aftermarket hoses for? Give us a shout and we can arrange a custom setup for you directly with Samco.

All the colors shown here are available for any of their part #s. Some colors are special order only. Contact us at z1sales@z1auto.com for further details for your car or truck.

NISMO Festival 2013

16 Dec

After taking a hiatus in 2012 due to NISMO moving, they were back this year with an amazing array of cars

 

Bring Back Victory by Design

8 Dec

Mr. de Cadenet, we miss you!

Chris Harris is the only one who comes close in my eyes, but these specials, shown on Speedvision (remember that name!?), went fairly in depth, and offered a unique perspective and insight

my personal favorite, because I love the pig car….

 

 

 

Why Stressing Over Tire Size is Useless

12 Nov

One of the most frequent questions we get is “what size tire do you recommend?”.  The most correct, but least awaited answer we can give is “It depends”.  Because frankly, tire size doesn’t really mean a whole heckuva lot. 

We’ve been taught, through some sort of mythical passdown of inaccurate information, that the first number in a tires size (let’s say, 275) is it’s width, in mm.  If that were true, things would be simple.  When you go into a store to buy a new shirt, you see the same phenomenon.  Some firms clothing runs bigger (or smaller) than others.    You may wear a 34 jean from one company, and a 36 from another.  Modifying a car is similarly inconsistent, and rarely is simple.  While the first number in a tires size CAN be it’s width in mm, it’s more often than not, a general target of width.  Now, on an otherwise stock car, this doesn’t really matter.  When you start altering suspension, dropping the car an inch (or more), fitting super wide, super low offset wheels, your margin for error decreases exponentially.  As the Pauli Exclusion Principal generally states (and was reinforced by Einstein and many others), 2 objects cannot occupy the same physical space at the same time.  So in the interest of avoiding tire contact with the body of the car, with suspension components, with the inner fender liners, etc, things become more complicated. 

This pictue is one Kwame posted several years ago, and it illustrates the point perfectly.

tiresize1

 

If you saw the above picture, which tire would you say is bigger?  The one on the left clearly.  But on paper, the tire on the right is bigger.  Both are mounted on the same 11.5 inch wide wheels.  The tire on the left is a  Michelin PS2, 295/30/19. The tire on the right is a Pirelli PZero, 305/30/19.  If you’re trying to get more “stance”, or gain a bigger footprint, which would you rather have?  The one with the bigger number on the receipt, or the one with the bigger physical dimension? 

Here is another picture of the same above example: 295/30/19 PS2 on left, 305/30/19 PZero on the right

tiresize2

 

So what do you do?  Check the manufacturers site!  Everyone should have the physical dimensions of their tires, in inches, for every corresponding ‘size’ listed on their website. 

 

What it Takes to be a Proficiently Fast Driver

27 Sep

Found this link via Will Burton, F1 commentator. In light of the opening of the movie Rush, it’s pretty good timing

Tech Talk: FRP (Fiberglass) vs Blended Materials for Aftermarket Body Kits

24 Sep

We get this question ALL the time – what is the ‘right’ material to select when buying aftermarket body parts? There are a range of materials that manufacturers use. Several higher end manufacturers, mainly in the Japanese realm, offer several of their products in both FRP as well as a blended, or hybrid material. FRP stands for Fiberglass Reinforced Plastic. This term is tossed around alot in the aftermarket aero world. It’s a bit of a catch all term, that generally describes a range of composites (parts made by mixing various materials together). Without getting boring, there are differences among “FRP” blends. Not only do the materials mixed together vary, so do the epoxy types used to hold them together. Since a fiberglass part is only as good as the quality of the mold used to produce it, that is why you see such a huge variation in pricing among parts that on their surface look similar. This is an area where you get what you pay for. For ease of terminology, I will stick to using the generic term “FRP”, but I am specifically referring to the better-branded/manufactured stuff out there, since that is what I am most familiar with. FRP has many fantastic properties. It is extremely strong relative (especially) relative to it’s weight (it’s light), it can be molded into many complex shapes, it is easily repaired should it get damaged, and it’s able to be produced at relatively low costs. FRP really has no downsides in and of itself, it is a terrific material for these type of parts. Some will say that urethane is ALWAYS better, and it’s simply not the case. Urethane molds are extremely expensive to produce, which is why you rarely see aftermarket aero parts offered in the material to begin with. When you do, they tend to be extremely heavy relative to their FRP counterparts. Urethane is extremely durable, mainly because it has so much tensile strength, but should it be damaged via impact, it’s very difficult (and often impossible), to repair. Most times when it suffers such an impact, it has to be replaced. Fiberglass on the otherhand can literally be decimated – shattered into multiple chunks after an impact, but joined back together relatively easily. Serviceability is a big benefit of FRP parts. Another issue with aftermarket urethane, that is often overlooked, is longevity. Depending on where in the world you live, the urethane can break down over the course of time, due to environmental conditions. This process can cause the urethane to lose its shape and literally deform. As this happens, its aesthetic value and its durability both suffer.

In the last 10 years (give or take), we’ve seen variations of fiberglass hit the market. These are components use a combination of different man made materials (urethane, various plastics, etc) added into the “FRP” mixture, and sealed with a different type of epoxy. The purpose of this type of material was to bridge the gap between the aftermarket urethane parts and the OEM plastic/urethane level parts. These blended, or hybrid materials are more flexible vs their straight FRP counterparts, but not as flexible as a full urethane part. In the case of manufacturers like INGS and CWest, their blended materials have the added bonus of requiring much less prep time before they are ready for paint. This type of manufacturing is more expensive to do, so only a handful of worthwhile companies offer it. Several try (mostly knockoff firms), and succeed to varying degrees. In many cases I have seen, while the material itself is generally quite good, in the interest the mold quality suffers. Molds are used for longer than they should be, or simply are inaccurate in the first place. This results in unwanted gaps when installed, or parts that are too long, too short, and require significant prep work in order to actually install on the car. Prep work is expensive, generally charged per hour, and can quickly make the ‘savings’ vs the genuine article disappear. While the hybrid/blended parts are slightly heavier than their FRP counterparts, they are nowhere near the level of a urethane part. Somewhere on the order of 5% or so heavier.

Light Content

22 Sep

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Sorry for the lack of content…accidentally had the auto-post featured turned off!

Reduce the Bodyroll

29 Aug

stswaybarset350z

Looking for a quick and affordable way to reduce the body roll, and increase the cornering ability of your 2003-2008 350Z, or 2003-2007 G35 coupe (or RWD sedan), then the ST Swaybar set should be on your To Do list. These are a solid steel set of bars front and rear, and unlike some competitors, include the required bushings. At $355 for the front and rear set, it’s a hard deal to beat.

Contact z1sales@z1auto.com to order yours

Kimi, Where Are You?

22 Aug

Conspicuously absent at Spa. Lotus posted this lighthearted screenshot to egg it on

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