Tag Archives: engine

HeadMaster Gasket Kit for Lancer Evolution

20 Sep

Time to do a new headgasket in your Evo? Afraid to see what the dealer charges? Don’t be! And don’t overpay. We have em put together for both the Evo 7/8 and 9’s. These gasket kits are totally complete, and include everything you need to do the job correctly, the first time! Headgasket, cam seals, valvecover gasket, sprak plug seals, grommets, cam seals, intake and exhaust manifold gaskets, downpipe gasket, 02 housing gasket. The whole shebang!

Need a combo with headbolts (stock or ARP), or our awesome Timing Belt Kit, let us know!

Priced from just $239 SHIPPED to all 50 states! Click the picture for details or contact us at z1sales@z1auto.com

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Evo X Stroker Kits

3 May

If you’re looking to step up your game with BIG power for your 4B11T, then you gotta stroke it! We’ve put together these stroker kits using proven, quality parts, taking all the guesswork out of it.

All bring you to 2.5 liters of total displacement. Components include a forged crank (4340 chromoly with 98mm stroke), your choice of rods (H or I beam configuration, and CP forged pistons with your own bore/compression choice. Coating for the pistons can be done at an additional cost. Bearings sold separately.

Prices range from $3090 to $3575 depending on spec and configuration

to order

Opposites Attract

12 Jan

These are new and now ready to go! ATS Japan’s ultra strength magnetic drain bolts for the oil pan, transmission and rear differential of your 350Z/G35!

These bolts are direct replacements for the factory units, and feature very strong 3,500 gauss, neodymium magnet for greater strength and durability. With an adhesion strength of up to 2.8kg, this product removes a greater amount of iron particles, thus extending the life of your vital engine components. The standard magnetic drain bolts tend to lose the magnetic force rapidly in a very high temperature environment. ATS magnetic drain bolts last much longer under the sustained high heat environments of even the hardest core track cars.

Click here to order yours!

Spring has Sprung

26 Apr

Was doing my normal Sunday morning ritual surfing around the net for cool stuff and came across some video excerpts from an awesome documentary on Cosworth engine builds.  It had a pretty minimal number of views and was only posted a month or so ago – “wow, cool” I thought.  Then of course I head over to Eric Hsu’s Blog – Beyond the Dyno. Of course, he had ’em posted (no shit, since he works there!). Anyway, good stuff, worth watching if you’re curious as to how important a valvespring is in the grand scheme of things.

NA is Dead?

19 Aug

All too often on the web, you see guys talking about making big hp on cars through forced induction. Whether it’s a supercharger, turbo, twin charged, etc., there is always someone pushing the envelope here.  But what about good old fashioned NA power?  No boost, no having to inject various concoctions of combustible chemicals to be able to crank the timing – just plain ordinary air? I think it often gets left by the wayside.

I wanted to start a multipiece series on NA tuning, with particular emphasis on what to many people is the pinnacle of an NA setup – the Individual Throttle Body, or in web language, ITB. Let’s just get a basic understanding of what an ITB is and how it works.

As the name implies an Indivdual Throttle Body (ITB) means each cylinder has it’s own dedicated path for the air to reach the combustion chamber.  The bodies are linked together so that they open and close together, thus allowing the engine to ingest the air required for the combustion process.  There are several benefits that an ITB setup can have over a single throttle body.  First and foremost is cylinder balance.  With a single throttle body, you have little to no control over how much air is ingested into the the combustion chamber for each cylinder.  As a result, you end up with air reaching the combustion chambers in varying amounts, at various speeds, which can leave you with cylinders producing different power levels.  The amount this differs of course varies by the application.  With ITB’s there is no sharing of air.  Each cylinder is afforded unlimited air, and through tuning, the user can ensure that each cylinder is ingesting the exact same volume per air, at the exact same velocity. The second benefit is throttle response. With each cylinder now able to ingest it’s own dedicated stream of air, the combustion process starts quicker, and the engine responds faster to throttle inputs.  Furthermore, because you now have individual paths of air vs a large single path, the volume of air and the velocity that can be ingested into the engine as the throttle plate opens is often more than a single throttle body setup allows.  We’ll go into more detail on this last point in a future installment, as well as determining the right manifold design for a particular application, all with real world testing, graphs, videos and dynos!

As best I can tell, the first production car to use both ITB’s and fuel injection was the very rare BMW M1. This car was manufactured from 1978 to 1981, and used a combination of ITB’s and a mechanical fuel injection system developed by Kugelfischer and Bosch.  BMW still uses ITB’s today on their M series engines.

 
 

In the next installment, we’ll look more in depth into various ITB setups as well as design differences, etc. In the meantime, take a look and listen at this clip from Option Video from Japan of a tuned Acura with ITB’s.  If this doesn’t make you fall in love with an automobile, it’s pretty safe to assume you have no soul!