Tag Archives: Pirelli

Why Stressing Over Tire Size is Useless

12 Nov

One of the most frequent questions we get is “what size tire do you recommend?”.  The most correct, but least awaited answer we can give is “It depends”.  Because frankly, tire size doesn’t really mean a whole heckuva lot. 

We’ve been taught, through some sort of mythical passdown of inaccurate information, that the first number in a tires size (let’s say, 275) is it’s width, in mm.  If that were true, things would be simple.  When you go into a store to buy a new shirt, you see the same phenomenon.  Some firms clothing runs bigger (or smaller) than others.    You may wear a 34 jean from one company, and a 36 from another.  Modifying a car is similarly inconsistent, and rarely is simple.  While the first number in a tires size CAN be it’s width in mm, it’s more often than not, a general target of width.  Now, on an otherwise stock car, this doesn’t really matter.  When you start altering suspension, dropping the car an inch (or more), fitting super wide, super low offset wheels, your margin for error decreases exponentially.  As the Pauli Exclusion Principal generally states (and was reinforced by Einstein and many others), 2 objects cannot occupy the same physical space at the same time.  So in the interest of avoiding tire contact with the body of the car, with suspension components, with the inner fender liners, etc, things become more complicated. 

This pictue is one Kwame posted several years ago, and it illustrates the point perfectly.

tiresize1

 

If you saw the above picture, which tire would you say is bigger?  The one on the left clearly.  But on paper, the tire on the right is bigger.  Both are mounted on the same 11.5 inch wide wheels.  The tire on the left is a  Michelin PS2, 295/30/19. The tire on the right is a Pirelli PZero, 305/30/19.  If you’re trying to get more “stance”, or gain a bigger footprint, which would you rather have?  The one with the bigger number on the receipt, or the one with the bigger physical dimension? 

Here is another picture of the same above example: 295/30/19 PS2 on left, 305/30/19 PZero on the right

tiresize2

 

So what do you do?  Check the manufacturers site!  Everyone should have the physical dimensions of their tires, in inches, for every corresponding ‘size’ listed on their website. 

 

Advertisements

The Tire War

26 May

20130526-083828.jpg

As those who follow F1 know, tires are the same for everyone. Everyone is handed out the same compounds and must run all of them during the race. Ok, sounds easy enough, fair enough, right? Ehhhh….wrong. During Friday, NBC’s Will Buxton took over NBCSports Twitter and was fielding questions. I asked about tires for the weekend…and the reply was “they are round, black and the same for everyone, lets race”. Well as it turns out, such is not the case.

See, F1 cars are very adjustable, very intricate machines. These are not spec cars. Nor are the staff each team employs. This is racing at its highest level: with the perennial levels of technology, and money all being mixed together in a world class stew. Will Buxton is now reporting that after Spain, in which Mercedes complained about their tires, was given a private test with Pirelli. 1000kms of private testing so Mercedes could “better understand how their chassis was relating to the tire”. It’s also being reported that Ferrari had a similar test after Bahrain. Certainly helps explain the awesome performances since those private tests were conducted. Of course such private tests are not allowed under the rules from a team level. But they are allowed under Pirelli’s contract as tire supplier for the series. Now, whether they plan to hold tests for each individual team remains to be seen, but its nevertheless going to be a hot topic.

One Lap Around Circuit of the Americas

15 Nov

Found this on Motor Authority

Very cool lap around the new Circuit of America in Austin, TX. Home of this
weekends US F1 Grand Prix

http://www.motorauthority.com/news/1080508_lap-the-circuit-of-the-americas-with-pirelli-video?utm_source=MotorAuthority&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+MotorAuthority2+%28MotorAuthority%29