Tag Archives: rx8

Powergrid Endlinks for your Porsche, BMW, Corvette, and More!

12 Jan

We’ve been offering the Powergrid endlinks for the 350Z and G35 for years. Google it, you’ll find out what everyone else already knows. That if you want the best endlink on the market, you found ’em. Well, we’re now carrying them for your Porsche as well.

This is why they are important, what they do, and why you want ’em:

The endlinks connect your swaybar to your the rest of your suspension. As the swaybar moves during a turn (or technically, resists moving), the endlinks job is to keep the bar parallel to the ground. Whether you have stock swaybars or aftermarket, the harder you push your car, the more prone your stock links are towards snapping, or breaking. Many modern day cars use links that are made of cheap stamped steel, and many are even plastic! They are designed to be used with softer stock spring rates, and less grippy tires than true enthusiasts tend to use. As you increase the grip of the car, the endlink is placed under greater strain to control that swaybar. The same holds true when you’re fitting larger diameter, and adjustable swaybars. These stiffer bars place greater load on the endlink and those stock endlinks were never designed with that force in mind. The second thing to consider is when fitting lowering springs or aftermarket coilovers. As you adjust the height of your car, you can often cause your swaybar to change position. That means during the compression stroke of the suspension, the stock swaybar can be limited in its movement (aka binding), which vastly reduces the ability of the bar to do it’s job. For those with coilovers, this becomes even more important if you’re looking to cornerweight your car. Having an adjustable endlink such as this allows you to adjust swaybar preload, and that translates into more effective cornerbalancing results and more effective swaybar tuning.

Applications – tons! If you’ve got a performance car, we probably have an application for you.

Porsche:

BMW: E30 (M3), E24, E28, E34, E39, E46 M3, E90, E60
Acura TSX
Audi TT
Cadillac CTS
Cadillac XLR
Corvette
Cobalt
Dodge Charger
Infiniti G35
Mini Cooper
Mazda 3, 6, Miata
Mazdaspeed 3 and 6
Mazda RX8
Nissan 350Z
Porsche 911, Boxster and Cayman
Scion TC
Toyota Supra
Toyota Celica
Toyota Corolla
VW GTI
VW Eos
VW Jetta

And we’re always looking to add more! These endlinks aren’t cheap to buy because they aren’t cheap to make. They use genuine THK components (THK is an OEM automotive supplier to tons of manufacturers). They don’t use hardware store heim joints like so many others out there. Those start out great and in short order tend to get very noisy as they are exposed to the elements, and accumulate dirt, sand, moisture, salt, etc. These endinks are different. They offer the articulation (ability for the endlink head to rotate, thus keeping the swaybar in the correct position), but are fully sealed. Never will require any maintenance – no grease, no cleaning, nothing!

Carbign Craft Dry-Carbon License Plate Backing for Mazda RX8

10 Oct

We just received the press release on this new item from Carbign Craft earlier today. I’m sure by reading the title of this post and looking at the pictures you already know what it is so there is no need for me to reiterate it. In any case its made from prepreg carbon fiber and through the use of a vacuum forming cure process in Autoclave (I’m sure you carbon fiber heads know what this means.)

The Little Engine that Could…

20 Aug

Close your eyes and try to remember the year 1997. Our business was growing at an alarming rate and all we could dream of was an OEM Auto industry that cared about the performance minded enthusiast.

The once-kings of Japanese performance cars had all been dethroned. The 300ZX and RX-7 were both already discontinued in the US and the Supra followed a year later. Despite stellar performance and sex appeal, they had all suffered from bloated price tags and lackluster sales. Moreover, they had become a faint shadow of each of the cars that paved their way. The early Z’s, RX-7’s and Celica-Supras had followed simple tried-and-true recipes for the sports car enthusiast; combine an eager engine with a sporty suspension and wrap it in a sexy affordable package. Sadly, by the late 1980’s, Nissan, Mazda and Toyota had created a war to see who could cram the most complicated technology under the hoods of their flagship sports cars. Ultimately, it led to their demise.

Ok, so it’s 1997 and the Japanese sports car is only attainable as a used model. That is until Acura announced that the Integra Type R would hit US shores. The 195 hp 2600 lb Type R was fast, raw, high-tech and affordable! The automotive press RAVED about it’s performance and other auto-makers took note. Soon enough, budget performance cars were released year after year and I think we all have to give the Type R some credit for the much needed spark that set our industry aflame for the next decade…

1998: Subaru came through with the Impreza 2.5RS. The mini-WRX was loaded with potential and Subaru geeks around the country united in parking lots and message boards. Soon ater, the car virtually exploded with popularity as Gran Turismo and Colin Mcrae Rally became enormous video games. We all drooled for a WRX.

1999: Toyota introduced a revised Celica. Co-developed by Yamaha, the high revving 180hp motor seemed to directly target the Integra Type R.

2001: Ford brought us the SVT Focus.

2002: Nissan gave us a revised Sentra SE-R (Spec V). Acura re-badged the Integra as the RSX and the world was introduced to the now legendary K-series motor. Oh, and Subaru finally sent us the famed WRX!

2003: A big year. Mitsubishi, hot on the heels of the Subaru’s success with the WRX, brought the EVO to the US. Nissan finally released a new Z car with the 350Z. Even Dodge joined the party with the powerful and insanely affordable Neon SRT-4.

2004: Subaru countered with the WRX STI and Mazda brought back the Rotary engine with the Renesis powered RX-8.

2006: Acura drops the RSX from it’s lineup, but bolts in all the go-fast goodies into the revised Civic SI.

2007: Mazda provides again with the brutally powerful Mazdaspeed 3. And Honda took everything that made their redesigned Civic SI a winner and put it all in the worlds first Civic SI Sedan!

Back to reality – it’s 2008 and us auto enthusiasts seem to be living in a new golden age. There is a sizable menu of performance cars to choose from in the range of $20k -$25k. How much longer will it last?

There are already signs that the trend may be shifting again. Subaru and Mitsubishi continue to fight it out as horsepower ratings and price tags grow. The EVO and STI price tags start around $35K. Even Nissan is rolling out the first Skyline GTR in the US but you have to pay to play and $70K is Porsche territory.

Are our beloved budget hot rods destined to become too fat and too pricey? Will we have to endure another cycle of bland offerings from the companies we all love again? Time will tell. For now, I think we should all bow respectfully to the USDM Type R and it’s B18C5 motor. The little engine that could…