Tag Archives: Whiteline

DIY Installation: Rear Differential Bushing

4 Mar

You’re only as strong as your weakest link. To that end, there are many small changes you can make that will literally transform how your car performs.

One issue that plagues the Z and G is rear wheel hop. Some try to “cure” it with an aftermarket differential, only to find the problem magnified. The solution are some rather simple looking, but ultra effective bushing replacements. The Z and G have a rather conventional differential (aka the pumpkin, because of its shape…even though on these cars, it looks more like a squash) mounting system with 2 “ears” at the front and a single, large rear bushing. The front set of bushings are mounted into the pumpkin casing itself. The rear bushing, however is mounted in the subframe. All these bushings are liquid filled rubber, encased in an aluminum shell. OEM’s use this style because its reasonably stiff and strong, but able to dampen out noise and road imperfections. The whole rear differential assembly weighs about 90 lbs, so those bushings are under tremendous strain as the car squats, launches and turns. What many owners find is the rear bushing eventually starts to weep its liquid out, eliminating its effectiveness. The tell tale signs are a black stain on the rear subframe. The subject car here didn’t have that issue, but that does not make the result any less awesome. On this car, the front bushings had previously been replaced with the solid SPL units several years ago. The rear most bushing never was done due to time constraints at the time. But that’s what is being tackled here.

Step one involves using some PB Blast and getting under the car and soaking the bushings. This will cut through any surface rust that may have developed, and give the factory bushings some slickness to help in its removal. Step 1.2 starts with unbolting the mid pipe, and loosening the rear swaybar brackets. This lets the bar spin upside down, granting you more room to work. The pumpkin comes out without the bracket removal but you will appreciate the room when reinstalling it. Next, remove the 4 bolts that connect the rear driveshaft yoke to the pinion flange. Next up, unbolt the output shafts from the axles. The axles will dangle in place which is fine. Next step is drain the differential fluid via the side drain bolt. From there, unbolt the speed sensors at either side. Be careful! your speedometer and ABS use these, so unbolt em and tuck them up top. If you can reach it, use a pair of needlenose pliers and remove the breather hose at the top of the pumpkin. Next, you’ve got the 2 14mm bolts at the front of the pumpkin, and the rear nut that is “in” the bushing in the rear subframe. A tranny jack and a friend are very helpful here. 90 lbs is a lot and this isn’t something you want to drop!

Rear pumpkin with axles disconnected:

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Next up is the big rear cylindrical bushing. Some people stop the whole subframe and use the opportunity to also replace the bushings that mount the whole rear cradle to the chassis. For this job, we are leaving the subframe in place. There are several methods to remove the large factory bushing. What we chose to do is use is a traditional removal tool to push the bushing out. Others choose to drill through the factory rubber, then saw several slits through the casing to collapse the bushing. Both methods work, just depends on your preference and tool collection.

Removal Kit:

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The removal kit works like a plunger. You have a “pushing end” and a receiver. A bolt rides through the center and is secured with a nut at the other end. As you tighten the assembly, the stock bushing is pushed through its residence until it “falls” into the receptacle. Going slowly is key as is generous amounts of PB Blast. You must ensure torque is applied evenly to avoid doing any damage.

Stock bushing removed with the help of a bushing removal tool:

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Daylight!

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With the factory bushing removed its time to install the new one. We chose the SPL solid aluminum bushing to match the ones previously installed at the front. This is a solid chunk of billet goodness, and provides the strongest possible mount with maximum stiffness. Whiteline and Energy make urethane versions as well. If you go the solid route, a word of advise. A day before you tackle the install, put the factory bushings in the freezer. This will contract then ever so slightly, but will allow them to slide more easily into place. Leave them in the freezer till its time to install them.

To install the new bushing we used a simple mallet and tapped it in place. It’s actually quite easy.

New bushing installed:

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From there it’s a reversal of the previous pumpkin removal procedure. Make sure you get the pumpkin all the way squared up to the subframe otherwise you will never get those 2 front mounting bolts back in place. We found that by installing the rear bushing nut and tightening first, it “pulled” the pumpkin more into place allowing the front bolts to more easily thread in.

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Bolt the driveshaft up, then output shafts and you’re done! Torque specs can be found in this diagram:

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The results? Awesome! You will LOVE this mod. Even though the front bushings have been installed for several years the rear is the most transformative. The car bites down much harder now from a dig as well as in the turns. We noticed a slight increase in noise due to the fully solid mounts but its so faint it’s not even worth mentioning. Launch the car and that “hop-hop-hop-hook” sensation you used to feel is now just a squat and hook. Your axles will thank you……

With the affordability of these bushings, it’s on that list of “must have mods” for this car.

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No Bling

6 Oct

Deconstructionism

13 Jul

So Kwame got off his lazy ass today and dropped his damaged, stock subframe. A brief encounter with a guardrail in the rain left this one with a fracture. Next up, swap the new one in, complete with the Whiteline and SPL bushings, as well as convert all the remaining rear rubber bushings to the Whiteline urethane ones as well. Rome wasn’t built in a day, this car sure as hell won’t be either (in fact it’s been exactly 1468 days since the car has been driven!)….but it will be worth it when it’s all done. There won’t be another Z33 out there as well balanced as this.

Putting the Power Down

9 Jan

350Z’s are blessed with the ability to put down copious amounts of power. The chassis is a terrific blend of comfort and strength, the engines can be built to near bulletproof levels, and the transmissions have proven themselves able to deal with tons of horsepower and torque. However, one area that is often overlooked are the factory bushings. Particularly at the rear of the car. Under acceleration, you will notice than a factory Z has a fair level of squat. While some weight transfer is good, when it all comes to powering out of a hole, from a dig, or at the dragstrip, that tilting is all wasted energy.

Whiteline has come up with a series of urethane bushing solutions to help deal with this. The latest addition is the Differential Positive Power Kit. This new kit from Whiteline is a 4 piece urethane bushing kit which is designed to serve as a supplemental form of support for the rear pumpkin. Unlike the competition, these bushings do not require you to remove the stock units. Instead, they slip right on top and bottom of them, and form a tough urethane barrier between the front pumpkin mounts and subframe. This gives you the compliance and silence of the stock bushings, with the superior strength of urethane, all in one! Coupled with the SPL Rear Solid Differential Bushing this will give a great setup that reduces the slop, gets more power transferred to the ground efficiently, without unwanted noise or vibration.

These are available for purchase now, and ready to go. Just click here to order yours!

Whiteline Plus 350Z/G35 Polyurethane Bushing Guide

24 Jul

whitelinetractionkit350zAmed copy

Unfortunately, some swaggerless shop  is going to copy this guide and use it on their website.  Remember where you saw this copy first!

Whiteline Plus 350Z/G35 Polyurethane Rear Bushing Guide

Here are the links to where you can purchase these bushings off of our website:

Front Bushings

Rear Bushings

WHITELINE PLUS 350Z TRACTION CONTROL BUSHING KIT

25 Jun

Umm, yeah so I already placed my order for these today for my own car as soon as I found out that these were en route. THIS IS WHAT I HAVE BEEN WAITING FOR!!!!!

WHITELINE PLUS 350Z TRACTION CONTROL BUSHING KIT

WHITELINE PLUS 350Z TRACTION CONTROL BUSHING KIT

One of the most noticeable compromises in Nissan suspension performance is the 4 points on the rear subframe. The bushes are a very compliant hydraulic filled rubber bush that permits squirming of the rear end under bump/turn/acceleration. Whiteline has recently added to the range of subframe kits that currently covers 240SX/ 300Z with a proven fix for the Nissan 350Z and G35 platform. W92994 features the latest technology WHITELINE PLUS polyurethane bushings, steel componentry and very informative install guide. The translucent black bushings boast voiding points so that elements of compliance is achieved. The kit replaces all 4 point of the rear cradle on a 350Z or G35 Infiniti and results in a more responsive, predictable and enjoyable driving ‘Z.’

Whiteline Plus 350Z Traction Control Bushing Kit

Whiteline Plus 350Z Traction Control Bushing Kit

Key Benefits of WHITELINE PLUS
-The quality of ride of rubber, with the performance of solid links.
-Long lasting durability.
-Resistant to chemicals, oils and weathering.
-Enhanced handling, steering response and road holding stability.
-Increased traction and power transfer.

WHITELINE PLUS is a range of ‘NO COMPROMISE’ polyurethane suspension bushings and components. By ‘NO COMPROMISE’ we are referring to the polyurethane’s ability to provide the quality ride of rubber at lowerspeeds and at higher speeds to become firmer,(somewhat progressive) when under cornering, accelerating and braking loads, for CHASSIS CONTROL and improved handling.

Applications: 03-07 Nissan 350z & Infiniti G35

We have a few kits ordered up for inventory and expect them very shortly so let us know if you would like one for your ride.

Whiteline Swaybars for 350Z/G35

14 Mar
Whiteline Swaybars 350Z/G35 - Click to Order!

Whiteline Swaybars 350Z/G35 - Click to Order!

We just received our first batch of Whiteline adjustable swaybars for the 350z and G35.  I gotta say, I am very impressed!  My own personal ‘default’ sways up till this point was Cusco.  I’ve run these on my own car for several years and they have served me well.  My only 2 complaints, and they were minor, was the lack of adjustability out back, and the fact that they resused the stock bushings.  Over time, the stock rubber bushings begin to crack and degrade (as I found out last summer – urethane to the rescue!)

The Whiteline bars take a page right out of Cusco’s playbook, but steps it up a notch.   These are solid steel bars, not hollow like Hotchkis, etc.  Hollow bars work great as well – it’s really personal preference at the end of the day.  I personally like the heavier, solid bars as they help to further lower the center of gravity of the car, by placing the weight low in the chassis.

The Whitelines measure 32mm up front (2 way adjustable), and 20mm out back (3 way adjustable).  They have integrated collars front and back to prevent the sways from walking in their mounts.  Plus, they include urethane bushings front and rear, and all hardware needed for the install.

A nice setup that is fully adjustable – all at an awesome price!  Click the picture above to order yours.

Whiteline Black Box Controller

23 Jan
Whiteline Black Box Controller

Whiteline Black Box Controller

Whiteline just released this very neat device for 2003-2006 350Z’s that have VDC (Vehicle Dynamic Control).  VDC is a vehicle stability software program that integrats through the C.A.N network on the Z, and uses the brakes, throttle, and steering angle.  Essentially it’s an anti skid setup.   The problem many have encountered is that on track days, VDC kicks on way too easily, and it really interferes with the fun.   There is a VDC off button, but as owners quickly find out, it’s never really off.

Whiteline now has a controller, that integrates with the factory VDC module, and allows the user to tailor it to best suit their driving style.  Allows you to store presets for various conditions, tracks.  Alot of possibilities seem possible. 

Check if out in action – very trick piece

To purchase, just give us a shout – we’re pricing them at $550.00.  Or, just order it off the website:

http://www.z1auto.com/prodmore.asp?model=350z&cat=handling&prodid=3556

Z1 Performance
www.z1auto.com
631.863.3820
AIM: Z1auto

Whiteline Suspension Products Now Available!

13 Jan

In our neverending quest to bring the best aftermarket performance parts to our clients, we are proud to announce we are now carrying the full range of Whiteline products! 

Whiteline is an Australian suspension manufacturing firm that was founded i the 1960’s.  In the world of aftermarket performance, that is several lifetimes ago!  They are well known particularly in the Subaru and Mitsubishi worlds as offering a variety of affordable suspension solutions tailored for a range of users.  From street to track, Whiteline has you covered.  They also offer parts for many other popular enthusiast  models, such as the Mini Cooper and Cooper S, Toyota Celica, Toyota Supra, and more!

We are constantly adding their products to our website.  If you have any specific questions, or need pricing information, just drop us a line:

 

Adam
Z1 Performance
(631)863-3820
www.z1auto.com
z1sales@z1auto.com
AIM: Z1auto